China

Has the bubble also burst on Chinese authoritarianism?

The titans of international finance have decreed that China's economic bubble was bound to burst because of unrealistic inflation of share values and property prices coupled with declining exports. Let's see if global gurus can also decipher that it is the very autocratic system they have venerated which is unsustainable.

Lawyers face assaults amid China’s crackdown on human rights defenders

Andrew Anderson is the Deputy Director at Front Line Defenders. This blog was originally published in The Irish Times on Sunday, 7 June 2015.

The Chinese leadership emphasises the importance of the rule of law while simultaneously subjecting those defending it to outrageous abuses. In the past six months lawyers have been assaulted outside courthouses by mobs and inside courthouses by state officials, all part of a concerted crackdown on human rights defenders.

China - Front Line Defenders calls for the release of Tang Jingling, Yuan Xinting and Wang Qingying on the one year anniversary of their detentionsposted on: 2015/05/15

16 May 2015 marks one year to the day since human rights defenders Tang Jingling, Yuan Xinting and Wang Qingying were detained by the authorities in Guangzhou city, Guangdong province.

China – Court Sentences human rights defender Liu Jiacai to 5 years in prisonposted on: 2015/05/11

On 11 May 2015, a Chinese court in Yichang City, Hubei Province sentenced human rights defender Liu Jiacai to five years' imprisonment on charges of 'inciting subversion of state power.'

Update: China – Guo Yushan and He Zhengjun at risk of criminal chargesposted on: 2015/04/28

The Beijing Public Security Bureau has recommended that human rights defenders Mr Guo Yushan and Mr He Zhengjun be charged with illegal business activity.

Women Human Rights Defenders in China: Twenty Years After Beijing, What's Changed?

When I arrived at the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women (FWCW) in Beijing, Chinese authorities welcomed hundreds of foreign dignitaries and international rights groups with rainbow coloured scarves. Yet, while China hosted what would come to be known as the pre-eminent gathering on gender equality for the next twenty years, the government was also systematically disempowering Tibetan women through its repressive policies towards the Tibetan Autonomous Region. At the opening of the conference in 1995, in protest against China's silencing of Tibetan women's voices, a delegation of exiled Tibetan women gagged themselves with the silk.

Throughout the conference, Chinese security officers filmed, photographed, and followed the Tibetan women. On the third day, the activists lead a workshop on "Women and Development in Tibet," which so angered the crowd that a counter-protest erupted. My self and colleague Frank Jennings – later known to the Chinese authorities as “Black Hand” for his outspoken work in support of women rights defenders in China – tried to act as human shields while Chinese men shouted and pushed Tibetan women to the floor.

Update: China – Five women's rights activists releasedposted on: 2015/04/14

On the evening of 13 April 2015, five women's rights activists, detained in China for over a month, were conditionally released.

China - Formal charges brought against human rights defender Mr Chen Yunfeiposted on: 2015/04/08

On 6 April 2015, the family of human rights defender Mr Chen Yunfei received formal notification from the authorities in Sichuan province that the defender has been charged with 'picking quarrels and provoking troubles' and 'inciting subversion of state power'. He is currently detained in Xinjin County Detention Centre in Sichuan Province, where he has not yet been permitted access to a lawyer.

14 March, marks a year to the day since Chinese human rights defender Cao Shunli died in custody in Beijing.

Cao Shunli was detained in Beijing in September 2013 as she attempted to travel to Geneva to participate in a training on UN human rights mechanisms. In the 52 weeks which have passed since her death, not one Chinese official has been publicly held accountable for her arrest, her treatment in detention, or the continued refusal by state security agents to allow her to receive medical attention despite her rapidly worsening health.

Who subverts the rule of law in China?

Apparently China's Communist Party apparatchik's are being told to switch their tinted glass Audis for more domestic models. Even the powerful have to look nervously over their shoulders, particularly as Xi Jinping continues his anti-corruption campaign. But you still have to wonder at how it is possible that a 74 year old human rights defender with slogans painted on sheets has been able to “destabilise and subvert” their rule.